Welcome to DCTMA!


The Delaware County Transportation Management Association (DCTMA) is committed to being an advocate for your business or community’s transportation needs. We offer a unique combination of services to access a broad labor pool, to analyze the location and commuting options of employees, to broker transportation, and to provide support for commuting employees. We are your advocate with transportation agencies and providers by serving on key committees of SEPTA, PENNDOT, and the Delaware Valley Regional Planning Commission.

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Latest News

  • Welcome Our New Project Coordinator!

    DCTMA welcomes Bridget Waldron as the new Project Coordinator.  Bridget is a West Chester University Marketing grad.  While at WCU, Bridget interned for Comcast-Spectacor as a Complex-Marketing Intern and the Philadelphia Flyers as a Community Relations intern.  She’s a Delaware …
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  • Too Tipsy to Drive this Holiday Season? “I SEPTA Media!

    DCTMA Revs Up Coaster Campaign to Help Prevent Drunk Driving Media, PA – Be sure your holiday season is merry and bright this year.  Don’t drink and drive – “I SEPTA Media!” The long Thanksgiving weekend is upon us, and …
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  • 2014 Access to Jobs EXPO

    On October 16th the Delaware County TMA in conjunction with Delaware County Council, Pennsylvania CareerLink, the Delaware County Commerce Center, and the Delaware County Chamber of Commerce, held the 20th Annual Access to Job’s EXPO. The event had an excellent …
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Winter Driving Tips from AAA

snowdrive

  • Avoid driving while you’re fatigued. Getting the proper amount of rest before taking on winter weather tasks reduces driving risks.
  • Never warm up a vehicle in an enclosed area, such as a garage.
  • Make certain your tires are properly inflated.
  • Never mix radial tires with other tire types.
  • Keep your gas tank at least half full to avoid gas line freeze-up.
  • If possible, avoid using your parking brake in cold, rainy and snowy weather.
  • Do not use cruise control when driving on any slippery surface (wet, ice, sand).
  • Always look and steer where you want to go.
  • Use your seat belt every time you get into your vehicle.

Tips for driving in the snow:

  • Accelerate and decelerate slowly. Applying the gas slowly to accelerate is the best method for regaining traction and avoiding skids. Don’t try to get moving in a hurry. And take time to slow down for a stoplight. Remember: It takes longer to slow down on icy roads.
  • Drive slowly. Everything takes longer on snow-covered roads. Accelerating, stopping, turning – nothing happens as quickly as on dry pavement. Give yourself time to maneuver by driving slowly.
  • The normal dry pavement following distance of three to four seconds should be increased to eight to ten seconds. This increased margin of safety will provide the longer distance needed if you have to stop.
  • Know your brakes. Whether you have antilock brakes or not, the best way to stop is threshold breaking. Keep the heel of your foot on the floor and use the ball of your foot to apply firm, steady pressure on the brake pedal.
  • Don’t stop if you can avoid it. There’s a big difference in the amount of inertia it takes to start moving from a full stop versus how much it takes to get moving while still rolling. If you can slow down enough to keep rolling until a traffic light changes, do it.
  • Don’t power up hills. Applying extra gas on snow-covered roads just starts your wheels spinning. Try to get a little inertia going before you reach the hill and let that inertia carry you to the top. As you reach the crest of the hill, reduce your speed and proceed down hill as slowly as possible.
  • Don’t stop going up a hill. There’s nothing worse than trying to get moving up a hill on an icy road. Get some inertia going on a flat roadway before you take on the hill.
  • Stay home. If you really don’t have to go out, don’t. Even if you can drive well in the snow, not everyone else can. Don’t tempt fate: If you don’t have somewhere you have to be, watch the snow from indoors.